Posts by Andreas Köstenberger

Does the Bible Ever Get it Wrong?

Posted by on Nov 18, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

My years as a Ph.D. student at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School were certainly a very mind-stretching experience. I took classes with D. A. Carson on the use of the OT in the NT, with Doug Moo on the Second Temple period and on the Septuagint, with Grant Osborne on apocalyptic literature, and many more. In these classes, I came to realize that many issues in NT studies are considerably more complex than the average person realizes. In fact, becoming aware of some of these issues can be confusing, even disorienting, and can leave people bewildered, unless they have the necessary scholarly... Read More

What Is God’s Gendered Design?

Posted by on Oct 24, 2014 in Blog | 2 comments

Margaret and Andreas Kostenberger recently fielded questions addressed to them by Matt Smethurst of The Gospel Coalition regarding their new book God’s Design for Man and Woman. Here is an excerpt of their interview: In the book you survey the Bible’s theology of man and woman. What do you understand God’s design for man and woman to be? In our biblical-theological survey from Genesis to Revelation we identify a pervasive pattern of male leadership as well as a pattern of male-female partnership. Far from flowing from a few isolated, debated passages, the pattern of male leadership... Read More

Does the Bible Reflect a Patriarchal Bias?

Posted by on Oct 6, 2014 in Blog | 1 comment

For many decades, feminists have characterized the Old Testament’s teaching on gender roles in terms of patriarchy, the control and domination of the father in exercising an authoritative, if not oppressive or even abusive, rule over his wife and family. What is more, feminists have often alleged that the Bible is laced with a patriarchal bias that they must “uncover” by a hermeneutic of suspicion and correct with a sort of “affirmative action” through which women’s rightful place in Christianity and in the world is reclaimed, restored, and recast. But is the underlying premise of... Read More

5 Things to Avoid When Discussing Gender

Posted by on Oct 3, 2014 in Blog | 1 comment

When it comes to gender, we live in confusing times. For many, gender has become merely a subjective reality. We are male or female because we perceive ourselves as such. As a result, we can alter our gender identity at will, because our perception of ourselves may change over time. In addition, gender is often viewed as socially constructed. We are male or female because we were raised as boys and girls according to certain stereotypes of what it means to be a boy or girl. But again, these stereotypes are changing, and so may our gender identity. Where do we turn in this age of rapidly... Read More

The Danger of Labels When Discussing Gender

Posted by on Oct 1, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

We believe that most labels are of limited value in describing any given topic or position, including the biblical terminology surrounding manhood and womanhood. Labels typically limit the description of a subject to a certain oversimplified caricature. The debates surrounding gender roles are no exception in that the discussion has been burdened with a simplistic kind of partisan, polemical, and politicized verbiage. As we’ve sought to elaborate in a recent post, the label “patriarchal,” for example, carries with it mostly negative baggage in our culture because of a heavy feminist... Read More

Raised on the Third Day

Posted by on May 14, 2014 in Blog | 6 comments

In my Answers Magazine article and in my book (co-written with Justin Taylor) The Final Days of Jesus, I have implicitly assumed that Jesus was crucified on Friday (though our main argument was that Jesus died most likely in AD 33 rather than in AD 30). I’m hardly the only one who believes that Jesus died on a Friday (“Good” Friday), but some have taken issue with the fact that such a belief stands in apparent conflict with Jesus’ statement in the Gospel of Matthew that “just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three... Read More

Ready for Easter?

Posted by on Apr 12, 2014 in Blog | 1 comment

Here’s what Easter may look like for many dedicated Christian families. Spring is always a very busy time of year, with spring cleaning, tax returns, school, and a million other things. You’d go to church and serve there in a variety of ways. But more often than not, Easter sneaks up on you. Palm Sunday? Oh, yes, it’s Palm Sunday! Perhaps the pastor preaches a sermon on Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem, where an excited crowd waves palm branches, and everyone in the congregation is upbeat. Problem is, the excitement soon wanes, and Jesus ends up crucified. Good Friday... Read More

Jesus in the News Again

Posted by on Jan 28, 2014 in Blog | 1 comment

With the forthcoming publication of Bart Ehrman’s book How Jesus Became God and the response How God Became Jesus by a team of scholars, Jesus will be in the news again. That’s a very good thing. It’s also terrific that scholars are rising to the challenge of responding to the skeptical questions raised by the likes of Ehrman. But at a deeper level, what is needed is to equip high school students and young college students, as well as their parents and youth leaders, to know what the issues are and to respond intelligently and biblically to questions such as, Why does God allow human... Read More

Best of 2013

Posted by on Dec 10, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Christmas is only a couple weeks away, which means it’s time once again for the best books in Bible and theology published this year. The list is inevitably subjective, and in many cases unsurprising, as certain books commend themselves by their self-evident quality and the scholarly stature of their authors. Needless to say, listing a book doesn’t mean I endorse all of its contents (in some cases, I haven’t even read the entire book yet!). With this in mind, then, are my top 10 books of 2013: 1. William Baird, History of New Testament Research, vol. 3: From C. H. Dodd to Hans Dieter... Read More

The Present and Future of Biblical Theology

Posted by on Jan 4, 2013 in Blog | 2 comments

In his influential address, “Discourse on the Proper Distinction between Biblical and Dogmatic Theology, and the Right Determination of the Aims of Each,” Johann Philipp Gabler (1753–1826) lodged the programmatic proposal that scholars ought to distinguish between biblical and systematic theology. In his lecture, delivered at the University of Altdorf in 1787 (the year the Constitutional Convention met in Philadelphia), Gabler urged his colleagues to place their theological edifice more overtly on a scriptural foundation: “There is truly a biblical theology, of historical origin,... Read More

Comfort Your People

Posted by on Jan 2, 2013 in Blog | 2 comments

“Comfort Your People” is a devotional from Isaiah 40:1–8. “‘Comfort, comfort my people,’ says your God. Speak tenderly to Jerusalem, and cry to her that her warfare is ended, that her iniquity is pardoned, that she has received from the LORD’s hand double for all her sins.” We all love to be comforted. So this word of comfort is good news for a people hungry for comfort. But wait! How is it good news that Israel “has received from the LORD’s hand double for all her sins”? From the prophet’s vantage point prior to the exile, it was indeed good news for him to... Read More

Best of 2012

Posted by on Nov 30, 2012 in Blog | 2 comments

This year has been a good year for Biblical Foundations™ pursuing its mission to strengthen marriage and the family in the home, the church, and society as we long to see all the world rest of biblical foundations. We are particularly grateful to Crossway for releasing Marriage and the Family: Biblical Essentials this year, an abridged version of God, Marriage, and the Family. Here, then, are the top ten books in biblical studies from 2012, in terms of their potential influence and utility: 1. Darrell Bock, A Theology of Luke and Acts (Zondervan). This, the second volume in the Biblical... Read More

What is the Hermeneutical Triad?

Posted by on Nov 13, 2012 in Blog | 1 comment

In my presentation today, I’ll introduce you to a set of new hermeneutical lenses I call “the hermeneutical triad”—history, literature, and theology. This hermeneutical triad forms the backbone of Dick Patterson’s and my new hermeneutics text, Invitation to Biblical Interpretation. What is the “hermeneutical triad”? In short, our core proposal is this: for any passage of Scripture, regardless of genre, you’ll want to study the historical setting, the literary context, and the theological message. Thus the hermeneutical triad consists of history, literature, and theology. As... Read More

Let’s Get Out the Vote

Posted by on Nov 1, 2012 in Blog | 1 comment

John Piper is going to vote. His reasoning is as follows: “Barring catastrophe, Obama or Romney will be president (yes, I know you may see it as a catastrophe even if either does get elected). The likelihood that both presidencies will be identical in the good and evil they do is infinitesimal. One will very probably do more good amid the bad, even if only a little” (http://www.desiringgod.org/blog/posts/i-am-going-to-vote). I agree. I believe this is a watershed election. While I have limited confidence in either candidate, I do believe that our nation is at an important juncture. Our... Read More

Which Bible Translation Should I Choose?

Posted by on Oct 16, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Trevin Wax with “The Gospel Coalition” recently interviewed Dr. Kostenberger on “Which Bible Translation Should I Choose?”. Here is the interview below. Why is this book needed? “Which Bible translation should I use?” is one of the most frequently questions we get asked. And, it’s true, choosing a Bible translation is a very important decision, because we need to be able to have confidence in the Bible we read and study and memorize. In my experience, people often choose a Bible because, say, John Piper likes it, or because of tradition or emotional factors. In... Read More