Posts Tagged "Scholarship"

Writing Tips: What Works?

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I love writing. Sometimes people ask me for suggestions on how to find time to write and how to be productive. Here are a few suggestions: (1) Be disciplined: Grind it out. Germans call this Sitzfleisch (essentially, the ability to stay seated and not to get up until a given task is accomplished). (2) Be flexible: Make a plan. Then get it done in whichever way possible. If you can’t get it done in the morning, don’t go to bed until you got it done whenever you can. (3) Be committed: Keep your writing commitments. Accountability is key. Writing never just happens. It takes... Read More

10 Reasons for Studying the History of Biblical Interpretation

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To learn to present your own views within the context of previous scholarship. Not engaging and interacting with others may indicate arrogance or laziness. To avoid dead ends and to learn from the mistakes of others. Unless we learn from history, we’re doomed to repeat it. To be disabused of the illusion of our own originality. We may think a given proposal is original with us when in fact others may have set it forth already. To probe the way in which underlying presuppositions have translated into specific approaches and exegetical results in the past so we can predict outcomes. To... Read More

What Is Your Calling?

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Josh Mann with “for the Sake of Truth” recently interviewed Dr. Kostenberger on “The Church, Academy, and Calling.” Here is the interview below. How would you describe the relationship between your “scholarly” endeavors and your involvement in the ministry of the local church? Being involved in the local church has become increasingly important to me. Teaching a group of people of various ages and backgrounds at my church keeps pushing me to present the teachings of Scripture in a way that is relevant and understandable. This past Sunday, for example, I was... Read More

Got Excellence?

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[NOTE: This devotional was originally given at the 2012 Southeast ETS regional meeting.] My topic for our devotional today is excellence: excellence in general and scholarly excellence in particular. Some of you may have seen my recent book on the subject, Excellence: The Character of God and the Pursuit of Scholarly Virtue, so I’ve recently had the chance to reflect extensively on the subject and would like to share some of the insights I gained from my study with you. My hope is that by looking at what Scripture has to do say about our need to pursue excellence we will be challenged and... Read More

The 7 W’s of Writing

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I just finished teaching a seminar, Introduction to Research, to first-year doctoral students in my role as Ph.D. Director at Southeastern Seminary. You may enjoy a brief snippet from this two-day seminar in which I shared some random reflections on the seven W’s of writing. 1. Who? Who are you? Are you writing self-consciously and professedly as a believer? Or are you writing covertly, in a chameleon-like fashion taking on the color of your environment? To other believers, you use fervent Christian language; to critical scholars, you hide behind scholarly jargon? Who you are is a function... Read More

Adolf Schlatter: A Model of Scholarship

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One of my scholarly and personal heroes is Adolf Schlatter (note that in recent years, Schlatter has been charged with anti-Semitism in some of his writings; however, the issue is too complicated to be adequately discussed here). At a time when Adolf Harnack espoused his liberalism, and Rudolf Bultmann eclectically appropriated David Friedrich Strauss’s mythological approach and Martin Heidegger’s existentialism, Schlatter stood firm in his advocacy of a biblical-theological, salvation-historical reading of the Bible and a high view of Scripture. In the foreword to The History of the... Read More

The Future of Evangelical Scholarship

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Who is setting the agenda for evangelical scholarship? Too often, it is non-evangelical scholars. Recent examples include Bart Ehrman’s Misquoting Jesus and his other writings on early Christianity as well as the ubiquitous Da Vinci Code, which have generated a whole swath of evangelical responses. But are evangelicals forever doomed to take their cue from those outside their movement and to busy themselves with responding to the works of others? I recently had the opportunity to reflect on issues such as these when I was asked to represent the field of New Testament in a panel discussion... Read More