Posts Tagged "Theology"

Ready for Easter?

Posted by on Apr 12, 2014 in Blog | 1 comment

Here’s what Easter may look like for many dedicated Christian families. Spring is always a very busy time of year, with spring cleaning, tax returns, school, and a million other things. You’d go to church and serve there in a variety of ways. But more often than not, Easter sneaks up on you. Palm Sunday? Oh, yes, it’s Palm Sunday! Perhaps the pastor preaches a sermon on Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem, where an excited crowd waves palm branches, and everyone in the congregation is upbeat. Problem is, the excitement soon wanes, and Jesus ends up crucified. Good Friday... Read More

Jesus in the News Again

Posted by on Jan 28, 2014 in Blog | 1 comment

With the forthcoming publication of Bart Ehrman’s book How Jesus Became God and the response How God Became Jesus by a team of scholars, Jesus will be in the news again. That’s a very good thing. It’s also terrific that scholars are rising to the challenge of responding to the skeptical questions raised by the likes of Ehrman. But at a deeper level, what is needed is to equip high school students and young college students, as well as their parents and youth leaders, to know what the issues are and to respond intelligently and biblically to questions such as, Why does God allow human... Read More

Best of 2013

Posted by on Dec 10, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Christmas is only a couple weeks away, which means it’s time once again for the best books in Bible and theology published this year. The list is inevitably subjective, and in many cases unsurprising, as certain books commend themselves by their self-evident quality and the scholarly stature of their authors. Needless to say, listing a book doesn’t mean I endorse all of its contents (in some cases, I haven’t even read the entire book yet!). With this in mind, then, are my top 10 books of 2013: 1. William Baird, History of New Testament Research, vol. 3: From C. H. Dodd to Hans Dieter... Read More

The Present and Future of Biblical Theology

Posted by on Jan 4, 2013 in Blog | 2 comments

In his influential address, “Discourse on the Proper Distinction between Biblical and Dogmatic Theology, and the Right Determination of the Aims of Each,” Johann Philipp Gabler (1753–1826) lodged the programmatic proposal that scholars ought to distinguish between biblical and systematic theology. In his lecture, delivered at the University of Altdorf in 1787 (the year the Constitutional Convention met in Philadelphia), Gabler urged his colleagues to place their theological edifice more overtly on a scriptural foundation: “There is truly a biblical theology, of historical origin,... Read More

Comfort Your People

Posted by on Jan 2, 2013 in Blog | 2 comments

“Comfort Your People” is a devotional from Isaiah 40:1–8. “‘Comfort, comfort my people,’ says your God. Speak tenderly to Jerusalem, and cry to her that her warfare is ended, that her iniquity is pardoned, that she has received from the LORD’s hand double for all her sins.” We all love to be comforted. So this word of comfort is good news for a people hungry for comfort. But wait! How is it good news that Israel “has received from the LORD’s hand double for all her sins”? From the prophet’s vantage point prior to the exile, it was indeed good news for him to... Read More

What is the Hermeneutical Triad?

Posted by on Nov 13, 2012 in Blog | 1 comment

In my presentation today, I’ll introduce you to a set of new hermeneutical lenses I call “the hermeneutical triad”—history, literature, and theology. This hermeneutical triad forms the backbone of Dick Patterson’s and my new hermeneutics text, Invitation to Biblical Interpretation. What is the “hermeneutical triad”? In short, our core proposal is this: for any passage of Scripture, regardless of genre, you’ll want to study the historical setting, the literary context, and the theological message. Thus the hermeneutical triad consists of history, literature, and theology. As... Read More

Which Bible Translation Should I Use?

Posted by on Sep 11, 2012 in Publications | 2 comments

Which Bible Translation Should I Use?
One of the most frequently asked questions related to the Bible is, “Which Bible translation should I use?” People often wonder what is the all-around best English Bible translation available. In this book, Douglas Moo, Wayne Grudem, Ray Clendenen, and Philip Comfort make a case for the Bible translation he represents: the NIV 2011 (New International Version), the ESV (English Standard Version), the HCSB (Holman Christian Standard Bible), and the NLT (New Living Translation) respectively. In each case, the contributors explain the translation philosophy under- lying these major recent... Read More

Does John Teach a Replacement Theology?

Posted by on Aug 19, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

John does not teach a replacement theology whereby the church takes the place of Israel. As a closer look at John 15 indicates, it is not believers in Jesus who are depicted as the vine. Rather, the vine is Jesus. Jesus himself is therefore the new Israel, just as he has already been portrayed as the replacement of the temple and the fulfillment of the symbolism of various Jewish festivals. Jesus thus embodies and fulfills God’s true intentions for Israel; he is the paradigmatic vine, the channel through whom God’s blessings flow and who bears much fruit. Indeed, by dying Jesus will prove... Read More

The Lion and the Lamb

Posted by on Aug 10, 2012 in Publications | 4 comments

The Lion and the Lamb
Engaging and accessible, The Lion and the Lamb is an ideal resource for college students and others interested in knowing the essentials of each New Testament book. A concise summary of The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown – the acclaimed New Testament introduction by the same authors — this volume sets a new standard for high-level, up-to-date research presented in a core knowledge format that is practical, relevant, and easy to follow. Part One features chapters on the nature of Scripture and the religious and political background of the New Testament. Part Two covers the... Read More

Surrejoinder to Voddie Baucham

Posted by on Aug 25, 2010 in Blog | 3 comments

Voddie: Thank you for these additional points of follow-up. First of all, thank you for articulating your strong commitment to regenerate church membership, with implication for observance of the Lord’s Supper. I accept your assurance that this is not an FIC issue even though Presbyterians will differ from Baptists on these matters. Perhaps a bit more dialogue is needed on this to crystallize the issue even more clearly. I’m not sure what was unclear about my response regarding the Mohler blog. As I tried to indicate, Dr. Mohler had planned to post a blog but did not end up doing so, and... Read More

Rejoinder to Voddie Baucham

Posted by on Aug 24, 2010 in Blog | 9 comments

Voddie: Thank you for taking the time to read the chapter on God, Marriage, Family, and the Church in the second edition of God, Marriage & Family and for your blog post in response to it. You are a man of God, and I am deeply grateful for your ministry. In fact, I endorsed your most recent book! I think it’s great that you and I seem to agree on the bottom line—you quote at length my positive and constructive prescription on how to move forward in encouraging family-friendly and family-oriented churches (though you prefer the term “family-integrated”). We also agree on the... Read More

Proposition 8

Posted by on Aug 12, 2010 in Blog | 1 comment

Christianity Today has an article on the recent Proposition 8 ruling that includes many different evangelical voices. Here is my response: The ruling shows that as Christians, we should not look for a political solution to the crisis surrounding marriage and the family in our culture. The only true and lasting solution is found in a return to our spiritual foundations. The Bible makes clear that marriage is God’s idea rather than a social contract that we are free to renegotiate based on changing social trends. But we can’t expect the unbelieving world or any government or... Read More

The Heresy of Orthodoxy

Posted by on Jul 24, 2010 in Blog | 1 comment

The Bauer-Ehrman thesis contends that “orthodoxy” is not a first-century phenomenon but only a later concept that allowed the Roman church to squelch alternate versions of Christianity. We have seen that Bauer virtually ignores the New Testament evidence while believing to find evidence for early heresy and late orthodoxy in various urban centers of the second century. Ehrman, likewise, makes much of second-century diversity and assigns the notion of orthodoxy to later church councils. The precursors of the orthodox, Ehrman calls “proto-orthodox,” even though it must,... Read More

What Is the Gospel? 5 Observations

Posted by on Feb 3, 2010 in Blog | 1 comment

A while back, I contributed a chapter entitled “The Gospel for All Nations” to a book called Faith Comes by Hearing: A Response to Inclusivism (edited by Christopher W. Morgan and Robert A. Peterson (InterVarsity). Here are my five concluding observations: 1. Divine, not human: The gospel is God’s saving message to a world living in darkness and a humanity lost in its sin. The gospel is not a human message, nor was its conception a function of human initiative, but its origin and its impetus derive solely from God. For this reason our role with regard to the gospel is not that of... Read More

The Bible Among the Myths

Posted by on Aug 14, 2009 in Blog | 2 comments

In a Zondervan publication, John Oswalt, long-time Old Testament scholar and author of the two-volume commentary on Isaiah in the NICOT series, discusses The Bible among the Myths. In light of controversial books by writers such as Peter Enns or Kenton Sparks, Oswalt tackles an important question: How is the Bible (actually, the Old Testament) similar or different from other ancient (Near Eastern) literature? Is it, to quote the subtitle, “Unique Revelation or Just Ancient Literature”? In essence, Oswalt argues that while there are doubtless numerous surface similarities between the Old... Read More